That mum

Whenever my kids have scraped their knee at the park there has always been a nearby mum that magically produces a plaster (band-aid) while I am still rummaging in my bag (usually muttering "I'm sure that I had one in here somewhere").  No more.  Now I will be that mum.  Well, that might be setting my sights a little too high, but this little 1st aid kit pouch must improve my chances, right? 
Now all I have to do is put it in my bag and remember to replace the contents occasionally...


For those of you wondering whether I might have let zipper-phobia get the better of me, I do have an excuse: I sprained my ankle.  I've been far too grouchy and uncomfortable to tackle anything that didn't squeeze onto my little sewing surface.  Still, this 1st aid kit has been on my to-do list for about 7 years now.  Its time had come.


PS. Do we British really not ever say 'zipper'?  I always grew up saying 'zip', but I thought that was just the abbreviation and sewing folks might say 'zipper'.  Hmm.  Still, I think that Americans came up with the term, anyway, so it's not one that I can use my usual "we came up with the language, so our way is correct" excuse.  Despite the thousands of children growing up in bi-lingual households, my American husband is convinced that our offspring might fail in school because their mum says ZEBra instead of ZEEEbra...

22 comments:

  1. Oh well , as a UK mum , I am a catastrophe waiting to happen then. Having carried plasters in my bag for maybe three years, yet never stumbling upon the buggers when needed, I am now convinced .. they possess the ability of invisibly .. 'The Super Heroes of First Aid'

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  2. That is the coolest thing I have seen in a long time, definitely worthy of a seven year wait.
    I came across the word 'zipper' for the first time when I started blogging, it is definitely an American word. As is 'serger' which I (since blogging) always refer to what is, over here, an overlocker!

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  3. It's actually quite funny how languages change when transported to another land. In South Africa we say zip also, and definitely ZEBra. And how it changes too when spoken by someone whose mother tongue is not English. But I was stymied the other day when an African assistant in a material shop went on about what sounded like "reborn" being better than tape for fastening. Turned out she meant ribbon! Other changes I remember with amusement are "suet" for "suite", "JAYta" for "jetter", - and these by a radio announcer! Does one, or does one not correct outright mispronunciations, or leave them to it?

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  4. I LOVE IT!!! I fall on the category of mums that rummage on their bags not finding anything they are looking for! Anyway, as an English teacher, native Spanish, I must say that English language (American or British) is indeed a funny language...

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  5. do they really say zeeeebra ?? and I loooove when the uk mum up there is using "buggers"...I loooove it !!!!!

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    1. never occurred to me zeeebra could be said any other way!

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  6. this is really, really fantastic. Love the red cross "button"

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  7. I've always said 'zip' - I think it must be a Brit thing. I love the pouch. I could have done with one of them when my girls were small. I was hopeless - I regularly went out without even a spare nappy to hand, which caught me out a few times in embarrassing situations! XX

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  8. that is just brilliant using a red cross closure. well done mum! not sure how i made it this far without carrying a single band aid to the park with my guys (probably just jinxed myself now though) xx

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  9. That pouch is adorable. I am always the Mum without the plaster/wet wipes/ antibacterial hand gel. I can usually muster a tissue. I now cannot think if I ever call it a zipper. Perhaps not.

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  10. Your first aid kit is such a great idea! I'm terrible as well, my husband is always complaining that I never carry tissues around, but I do carry wet wipes though.

    I always say zips and ZEBra. When my American friends pronounce the letter 'z' I always get confused with 'c', but I'm slowly getting use to it now.

    I hope your ankle gets better.

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  11. Hi! I grew up saying zip (noun and verb forms) too. I'm from Singapore (ex-British colony) so zip probably is a British thing and zipper American :) We also said ice-box (back when I was small) as frequently as we said fridge (never refrigerator!).

    I think I could use a plaster pouch too ;)

    Hope you're feeling better!

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  12. You're going to hate me - I made a little pouch for plasters and calpol sachets a couple of years back (not as cute as yours) and it has been the most useful thing I think I've ever had in my bag. I've even doled out plasters in the middle of the Lake District to total strangers whose child had fallen off her bike ...

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  13. I just discovered your blog by accident, and I love it! I'll be back!
    I'm also a Brit away from home (though not quite as far away as you), I live in Germany with my N. Irish husband and our 3 kids who are growing up bilingually. Or trilingually if you count some of the N. Irish quirky as a language in its own right... my middle child actually has a far stronger N. Irish accent than her daddy!

    Think of it as enriching for your kids ;-) And I'm sure it makes them more attuned to language and therefore better able to learn a foreign language!

    Jill

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  14. Loving following your bog. I spotted a scrape on my daughters knee today and thought I'd be needing plasters on hand at all times shortly. I'll add this to my to-do-list and cross my fingers it doesn't take me too long to get to.
    We all-the-way over here in New Zealand call them zips and Zebras, overlockers and fridges :-) Totally normal!!

    Stink about your ankle.
    Happy creating!!

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  15. Gosh, I had starred this in my blog reader because I wanted to come back to it! This pouch is so very cool! I think you definitely improved your chances for being that mum. Now throw in a couple of safety pins, some small scissors, a tweezer, antibiotic ointment, and some ibuprofin and you will be the 5 star mum.
    Also, I got my embroidery package and am thrilled with it!! There something on it's way to you...

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  16. Well I grew up in the UK too, my mom was a wedding dress designer and dressmaker and I never heard the term zipper until I moved to the states, sooooo ....
    I say ZEBra too, as well as BARth, GRARs, BUNARNAR and apparently I say Hannah funny too, as well as a whole other slew of things, personally I think I'm misunderstood (quite literally)

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  17. Your quilts are so fantastic! It's so nice to find other quilters all around the world!
    www.quiltworld2.blogspot.com
    Yours, Ulla (from Finland)

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  18. I love the little first aid bag. I would love to do one of those. Great idea. I may do one for the car even...............love the button. Where did you find that.
    Janice

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  19. I love this, its so practical and I hope I will also find it easy to make. I'm a Brit too but living in England and I adore all these great blogs and creative projects. The only problem I find is getting hold of some of the materials, which are commonplace in the US and never heard of in the UK (for example I'm looking for Pellon and that sticky stuff you can draw and iron on to fabrics to use as a cutting guide which is sticky.)

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  20. I would love to know where you got the button. I love it.

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  21. Love your blog, it's so cool. I was wondering do you have a pattern for your first aide bag. This is what I truly need to keep with me (all the time). I love it and I look forward to making one. Thanks in advance.

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