More school clothes

Here's the pinafore. Yes, the British do also call some aprons a pinafore (or pinny), but a pinafore dress like this will also be called a pinafore. I have heard them called gymslips, mainly by my mum's generation, and tunics.
.
I'm not too sure why Americans call them jumpers. My own theory is they wanted to cause utter confusion. How else can you explain giving pretty much every item of clothing the name of a completely different item of clothing? Trousers = pants, pants = panties, waistcoat = vest, vest = tank top, tank top = sweater vest, braces = suspenders, suspenders = garter belt, pinafore = jumper, jumper = sweater etc. etc. Do you see what I mean? Utterly confusing.
.
As a side note: I really should try to remember to stop referring to my son's 'sweater' as his 'jumper' in front of his friends...
Anyway, here's another outfit for my daughter to wear to school. No doubt it would look much better with a white shirt underneath, but I refuse to put my kids in white if I can help it (I don't have much success with stain removal). I made up a pattern based on the bodice of this dress and the construction of this dress, with a couple of pleats and a belt added into the mix .
I really didn't like sewing with this gabardine fabric, though. This was the only fabric that the first fabric shop had in stock that would pass as a suitable colour and weight for her uniform. I eventually found some twill in the next place, which I used for yesterday's skirt. The twill was much easier to use and not as slippy - and easier to photograph. This one catches the light and looks several shades lighter in all of the pictures. Still, it turned out ok. It's fully lined with cotton, which helps hold the shape.
She should just be glad that she doesn't have to wear a shirt and tie like I had to...
.
Translation of the day:
UK English: shirt = a top with a collar and a buttoned opening all the way down the front = dress shirt or button-down in US English
UK English: dress shirt = formal shirt worn for morning dress or black or white tie events
US English: shirt = pretty much any top that isn't a jacket or a sweater. Dress shirts, t-shirts, polo tops, vest tops (tank tops), henleys, you name it, will all be referred to as just shirts.
.
It took some investigation to translate the school's uniform requirement (apparently a 'scooter' is a skirt with shorts hidden underneath), but I eventually worked out that a 'shirt with collar' meant that my kids could wear a polo shirt to school...

16 comments:

  1. I haven't ever heard the term scooter as anything other than a vehicle.
    The clothing terms are pretty funny between our cultures.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Jeepers, all those different terms would drive me bonkers! The dress turned out really nice though, as did the skirt yesterday!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Flipping heck what a nightmare. It's a wonder you are still sane after all that clothing name weirdness. The pinafore is lovely no matter what it's called.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I am so impressed!

    (But you do know that here in the UK, your daughter would HAVE to wear regulation static-shock-inducing skirts, a hand made uniform just wouldn't be allowed!)

    Thanks also for replying to my email - very kind of you to take the time in your busy life.

    I should get a book and write down all the translations...

    ReplyDelete
  5. it looks so nice - especially with the socks! i'm a UK girl in NZ and there is an item of clothing here called a 'skivvie' ..i'm still not sure what it is....

    ReplyDelete
  6. @ Emma: Skivvies are underwear (according to my hubby {who is former military, and a cultural guru} and is originally from the UK.

    I love the outfit, and enjoy the translations. My hubby was born in the UK, and my FIL works as the British - American translator for a big cooperation. He also worked as a translator for the US Airforce...

    ReplyDelete
  7. Awww, it's very lovely, and no doubt made better than the ones I bought from John Lewis with hems that came down within 2 wearings. Even the cheap Tesco ones lasted longer than that!

    I used to wear a tie too - maroon and gold stripes, no less - and apparently my niece still does though hers is pre-tied and threaded on elastic.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Yes Mom, your son would probably be embarrassed to have you refer to his sweater as a jumper here in the US, too funny! I have zero luck with white too, what's my problem?

    Adorable clothes!!!

    ReplyDelete
  9. LOVE everything, Dawn!
    The dress is perfect. I have a Burda pattern which is very similar. I always planned to make it into a checkered wool dress. Your simple version looks absolutely gorgeous.

    ReplyDelete
  10. School uniform lists drive me crazy. Nipper's list even told him what socks he had to wear.It does my head in!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Love your creations. I wouldn't get away with making 'schooliform' but I am joining in the challenge. Nothing to post as yet, in fact it took the first day to understand the pattern!!!

    ReplyDelete
  12. That's got to be your best linguistic investigation yet! I was really laughing! Do we really speak the same language?!
    Do they have blouses there, that's what I want to know?!
    I like her nice shoes too
    x x x
    Catherine

    ReplyDelete
  13. even more confusing when someone like me tries to learn English or/and American !!!
    however.... the dress... whatever its name is gorgeous ! I love the retro/vintage look !

    ReplyDelete