Kids' Clothes Week #2

Elsie Marley is hosting another Kids' Clothes Week Challenge and my kids need clothes, so here goes:
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First up is this skirt for school. We only found out the week before school started that my daughter got into the same school as her brother (thank goodness!), which didn't leave us much time for uniform shopping. It's a State school, but they have to wear uniforms, which I love. The only problem being that there was not much left in the stores one week before the start of term and what was left was usually way too big for my apparently petite daughter. 10 stores later (and a large pile of over sized clothes to return), all we had was some shirts, a skirt and a pair of shorts.
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So, here's a pleated skirt to put off doing the laundry for another day each week.
It was going together really well. The top stitching was looking good, the seams were French seams, the hem was straight. I couldn't believe that a pattern that I was putting together as I went along was going so smoothly...
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So it goes without saying that the so-called one-stop-button-holer on my machine tried to eat the skirt. With the aid of my seam ripper and a bit of satin stitching around the button hole, I think that I managed to save it - just please don't look too close at the button hole...
nb. Her school shirts are shorter than this one.
Next up, a pinafore.
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Translation of the day:
UK English: pinafore = jumper in US English
UK English: jumper = sweater in US English
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(I've mentioned these before, but even I still have trouble keeping the clothing terms straight...)
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UK English: State school = school offered to all children by the government = public school in US English
UK English: public school = a fee-paying school.
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According to wikipedia: "Public" is used here in a somewhat archaic sense, meaning that they are open to any member of the public, distinguished from religious schools which are open only to members of that religion. Personally I think that the English use the term just to confuse everyone.

12 comments:

  1. you more than saved it !!! Couldn't even tell there was a problem.

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  2. had the same thing happen on a jacket- everything perfect untill the button holes!! i ended up hand stitching them!!

    how is a pinafore a jumper???

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  3. those button holer-things ... gets ya every time.

    cute skirt! I had the same problem trying to find some shoes for my oldest ... only, I can't make shoes :-(

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  4. Hehehehe, I so love your little translations.

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  5. I love the pleats!

    And nice save on the buttonhole.

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  6. for us a pinafore is an apron.
    Great skirt!
    I was having some major buttonhole irritation yesterday, myself.
    Your solution is perfection!

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  7. you are a kids' clothes inspiration! Great skirt--even the button hole looks awesome.

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  8. Those pleats look great!

    My machine makes buttonholes and I
    attempted it once, I still find it easier to do them by hand.

    So is a gymslip a specific type of pinafore, or is that word not used any more and I've just been reading too many old British kids books? We use the word pinafore here to mean a sort of apron that's worn over a dress, like the white apron Alice wears over her blue dress in Alice in Wonderland.

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  9. Interesting about the difference between public school in the U.S. and U.K.!

    Adore the skirt. Super cute!

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  10. Cute - pleats scare the heck out of me, let alone button holes! The jumper/pinafore thing confuses the heck out of me too.

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  11. I hate button holes...it seems that my machine too....can't have one traight....I loooove the skirt !!

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  12. Super cute! I am loving your translations, totally make me laugh as some of them are simlar to AUS and some would still have another third meaning. -kb

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