Too tired to come up with a title

Snowman. Because I'm unlikely to get a real one around here.
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I really hate weaving in loose ends, but I did finally got out the yarn needle and sit down the other evening to finish off a couple more gifts. Here's a crochet scarf made using this pattern:This one's a baby blanket for a wee boy: I really ought to come up with something a bit more interesting for the baby boys. Oh, that reminds me - I've had quite a few people ask me for the pattern for the baby blankets that I make based upon the Rhubarb scarf. I'm happy to share it, but the stitch pattern came from a stitch pattern book. Is it violating copyright laws to share the pattern, or is the book taken as just being a teaching tool for various stitches? Does anyone know if you are allowed to share projects made from those stitch patterns?
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While I'm asking questions, I've had a couple of people mention that they've had trouble commenting on this site. Has anyone else had issues? E-mail me (address is over there at the top on the left) if you can't comment. The 100th post giveaway is slowly approaching, so I'd like to be sure that all is well by then.
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It's been at least 25 years since I last made a pom-pom.
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I had better run - busy day today. Take care,

23 comments:

  1. I am posting a quote from http://www.knitty.com/ISSUEfall03/FEATcopyright.html, the whole article is pretty long but interesting. But I think this is the relevant bit for your question.

    "1. I'm designing a knitting pattern. Can I use a stitch pattern I've seen somewhere before?
    The building blocks of stitch patterns -- knit, purl, cable, twist, increase, decrease, yarn over, and so forth-- are not protected by copyright. They're techniques. However, their combinations might be protected.

    If the stitch pattern is in the public domain, then the answer is yes, you can use it. However, it is not so easy to determine whether a stitch pattern truly is in the public domain. 'Public domain' does not mean that the stitch pattern or other work has been published and is freely available. 'Public domain' means that any copyright in the work has since expired.

    Where have you seen the stitch pattern? Is it a traditional stitch handed down from the knitting dawn of time [which suggests it is traditional], or is it someone's original creation? Is it in every stitch dictionary you've ever consulted, or have you only seen it in one place? The more common the stitch pattern is, the more likely it would be considered to be in the public domain.

    This does not mean, by the way, that you can just slap your stitch dictionary on the scanner and publish a copy of the chart or photograph. Do your own work.

    Even if you’ve determined that the stitch patterns you want to use are traditional, there might be more to consider. An arrangement of selected traditional stitches may also be protected by copyright, if the arrangement itself is original."

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  2. No idea about the copyright, sorry. But I do love your snowy snowman.

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  3. Well, I've had quite a few people say they can't comment on my blog - which does at least make me feel better...!! No idea why - although we do both use blogger, so maybe it's something to do with that?
    You're really missing winter aren't you??!

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  4. very cute projects! that snowman!!!!! I want to hug him

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  5. The commenting seems OK to me at the moment! I love your snowman - I am not sure about copyright for stitch patterns - sorry.

    Pomona x

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  6. I love your boy blanket! I tend to give blankets and burp cloths to boys, myself. But I'm thinking my new go-to gift might be these in boy colors/patterns: http://tinyurl.com/ydvtjzt
    They only take about half an hour to make.

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  7. Your snowman has the cutest arms ever!

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  8. I was able to comment no problem (obviously).

    If you can't share the stitch pattern (I have no idea if that's allowed or not) could you just say some thing like:

    "using the stitch pattern found on page #this&that of book Sew&So"

    I then did four rows like this and four like that...

    Or whatever. (Sorry if that's not clear or applicable, I'm not a knitter.

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  9. Apologies for my comment having nothing to do with your post. So I've taken to watching this UK show called 'Wheeler Dealers' - have you seen it? The presenters use such wonderful UK sayings - such as 'sorted' or 'straight'. I giggle and long for home all the way through it. Hubby like the program for the cars. Random comment I know - I just love the translation portion of your blog ;-)

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  10. What cute projects you've made.

    Yes, pom poms seems the order of the day here too.

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  11. Cute snowman! I'll trade my Kentucky winter for your California one. (Although I'd rather be in Georgia than California.) I don't think I'm having trouble commenting though.

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  12. I love your wee snowman, he's so cute.

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  13. I love your snowman too! very sweet x

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  14. I love everything! What a cute snowman!

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  15. oh, earlier today (about 2 hours ago), I couldn't leave a comment...

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  16. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  17. is it weird that you snowman makes me feel warm and fuzzy? Not sure about the copyright issue, but I suspect that the stitch pattern is unique enough to not be legally shareable.

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  18. Cute tiny scarf on the snowman. I like the idea of knitting mini things. I reckon I probably last made a pompom 25 years ago too!

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  19. The snowman is so cute!! I've been reading your blog for a while, and I really like it! Thanks for sharing with us! :D

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  20. heehee...I had to come back and see the snowman again....

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  21. I recently discovered your blog and it makes me feel normal. I'm an ex South African who lived in the UK for ten years before moving to the Netherlands and I so get what you mean with the language differences and the understanding of some british words. Your little notes on UK/US differences make me smile as I can relate to them. Being someone who has only very recently started to delve into the life of sewing and crafts, your commentary on your understanding again helps me feel normal in a world full of people who seem to speak a craft language I was completely unaware of and still don't really understand.
    Keep blogging in your own unique style, making my life feel normal once again. ;)

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  22. love the little snow man, just popping by from Handmaden's. We can make the real thing here in Canada today, as its snowing like crazy here in Southern Ontario.

    If you were in Britain in the late 70's pop by my blog for a blast from the past music video!!

    Gill in Canada

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