(Somewhat) Satchel

The bag that was going to be a scarf. Carefully cropped so that you can not see what a mess my garden is. It's been too darn hot to do any gardening lately...
.
I found a new yarn shop, full of what seemed to be very impractical yarn. Still, I found myself unable to leave without purchasing a couple of skeins of this yarn (#1 and #22, I think). I do not normally even wear pink. I started a scarf, but soon realised that it was going to be itchy. This is weird yarn - it felt really soft when balled up, but felt kind of rough and scratchy when I was actually working with it. Maybe it's just me. Even so, I knew that I didn't want it around my neck, so I hoped that there was enough to make a bag from instead. The (Somewhat) Satchel was knocked out.
Disclaimer: I don't know what I am doing when it comes to crochet and often wonder if I am just making things up as I go along, but I thought I'd attempt to share the pattern with you anyway. If you do try making one, I'd love to get some feedback about any errors (I'm awful at counting stitches and rows) and ideas for better phrasing or the correct way of doing this etc.
.
The bag body is made in one piece, starting with the base. You will add a row of single crochet around the edge of the base, then work in the round up the sides. The flap is then worked back and forth in rows. The shoulder strap and buckle straps are made separately in contrasting yarn and sewn on at the end.
You will need:
approx 180 yards / 160cm of heavy worsted yarn (I used 2 skeins of Savanna by GGH)
1 skein of yarn in a contrasting colour for the straps (I used Vanna's Choice by Lion's Brand)
2 buckles (I bought a couple of dirt cheap cat collars and removed the buckles)
US size K 10.5 hook (6.50mm)
US size I 9 hook (5.50mm)
Yarn needle
.
Abbreviations used (nb. I'm using the American stitch terms):
ch = chain
sc = single crochet
dc = double crochet
fpdc = front post double crochet (a search on the 'net shows lots of great tutorials for this easy stitch - it's the same as a dc, but you put the hook behind the 'post' of the stitch)
sl st = slip stitch
rep = repeat
.
gauge: 30sc = 8" or 20cm
finished bag measures approximately 8" x 2½" x 5½" or 21cm x 6cm x 15cm
.
BAG BASE:
Row 1: (Using the larger size K hook) ch 30
Row 2: ch 1 to turn, sc in second ch from hook and each ch across =30sc
Rows 3: ch 1 to turn, sc in each sc across
Rows 4-10: rep row 3
At the end of row 10 you will work down the side of the piece (ie. along the short side of the rectangle), and then around the first edge (row 1) and then up the other side:
Turning the corner, sc in last sc of row 10 again (marked ** on picture), then sc in each of the gaps (marked *) down the edge (9sc). Turn the corner, sc in each of the ch of row 1 (30sc). Turn the corner, sc up the remaining edge (9sc).
.
BAG SIDES (worked in the round):
Round 1: sc in the back loop (furthest loop from you of the two top loops that make a single chain) of each sc all the way around = 78sc
Round 2: (switch to smaller size I hook) dc in each sc all the way around = 78dc
Round 3: fpdc, dc in next 28dc, fpdc, dc in next 9dc, fpdc, dc in next 28dc, fpdc, dc in next 9dc (the fpdc are at each of the corners of the bag)
Rounds 4 - 13: rep round 3
Round 14: fpdc, dc in next 28dc, fpdc, dc in next 9 dc, fpdc, dc in next 28dc, fpdc, dc in nect 8dc, sl st in last dc
.
BAG FLAP (worked back and forth in rows):
Row 1: ch 3, (continuing along the long edge of the bag) dc in next 29 dc
Row 2: ch 3 for turning chain, dc in next 29 dc
Rows 3 - 11: rep row 2
.
I then did a row of sc down the side of the flap, around the top of the bag and up the other side of the flap and along the top of the flap. This gives it a nice neat edge, but isn't necessary.
.
In contrasting yarn:
SHOULDER STRAP:
Row 1: ch 200
Row 2: ch 1 to turn, sc in each ch
Rows 3 - 8: rep row 2
Sew strap on outside of bag using the yarn.
.
BUCKLE STRAPS (nb. The inside edge of my buckle was equal to 3 rows of crochet. You may need fewer or more rows, depending on the width of your buckle) :
Make 2:
Row 1: ch 10
Row 2: ch 1 to turn, sc in each ch
Row 3: ch 1 to turn, sc in each sc.
Sew buckle onto the end of this strap.
.
Make 2:
Row 1: ch 21
Row 2: ch 1 to turn, sc in each ch
Row 3: ch 1 to turn, sc in each sc
.
Sew the 2 straps attached to the buckle onto the front of the bag, then (making sure that they are in line with the buckles) sew the longer straps onto the flap of the bag (use the picture as a guide)
You're finished. As modelled by a pyjama-clad kid in a garden that needs raking:
Wow, it seems a lot more complicated when you're writing out every step, but it's not a hard bag to make.
.
Translation of the day:
UK English: purse = small coin purse (feminine version of a wallet) in US English
UK English: handbag = purse, handbag or (apparently) pocketbook in US English.
.
I had to look pocketbook up after reading that word the other day. I had no clue what was being referred to, but guessed that they weren't talking about a paperback book. Is it in common usage over here?
.
nb. I have a lot of catching up to do. I am way behind on replying to people, but I have an old wrist injury keeping me from spending much time on the computer. A police dog bit me 10 years ago (no, I wasn't on the run from the law - I just knew the dog handler) and it still keeps playing up (my wrist, that is. Hopefully the dog has stopped playing up).
.
Not too long to go 'til my 100th post and a giveaway. I'll give you a clue - there'll be some fabric up for grabs. It seems like I bought it ages ago now. I was under the illusion that I would be posting regularly and often over the summer... Take care all.

30 comments:

  1. Wonderful Pattern. I am becoming a follower so I can keep up with you.

    And, yes, pocketbook has been a common word in the US. I said "has" because I am not sure how much it is used anymore but when I was growing up, in the 1950's, it was very common. As a matter of fact, that was what my father always called his billfold. Why, I don't know, but he did.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I always thought a "pocketbook" was a large wallet (the kind you can keep your checkbook in).
    It is kind of an old-timey term though.

    ReplyDelete
  3. My Great Aunt always refered to her handbag as her 'pocket book'. It sounds funny when I say it now, but it seemed a 'regular expression' then!

    ReplyDelete
  4. The use of the word Pocketbook has gone the way of the Do-do over here. I am sure you will still run into someone using it here and there, but I am pretty sure my kids will never use it. Funny thing is, I thought it was a UK term. HA! Shows how much I Know.

    ReplyDelete
  5. What a great pattern! You're so clever.
    I've heard "pocketbook" used almost as much as "purse", now that I've moved to Virginia. I might be the only person in my small town who carries a "purse."

    ReplyDelete
  6. I think "pocketbook" and "purse" may be regional. I grew up in Georgia calling mine a "pocketbook" and then started calling it a purse to fit in somewhere. I still go back and forth between the two, and my mom calls hers a pocketbook. My two year old goes back and forth too.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Sounds like you had a fantastic summer break - and managed to make some stuff too...

    ReplyDelete
  8. that turned out really cute! I love the little straps. Hope your wrist is feeling better:)

    ReplyDelete
  9. good for you to just go for it and write a pattern...you're so brave and your (somewhat) satchel is just adorable!

    ReplyDelete
  10. so beatifull! And a good idea too.
    Thanks to visit me!

    ReplyDelete
  11. You have such a beautiful and creative blog, and it's lovely to see that your children play a major role in your creativity.

    I am not very creative at all, maybe oneday I begin to explore that side of me more, but for now I will read and be inspired by you and your many wonderful creations that also make people smile.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Seriously, that bag is genius! I love the brown, love it!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Frankly I'm in awe that you just come up with your own pattern, and that you can then translate it for others to use! Cool!
    Oooh, I'll definitely be watching for a fabric giveaway!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Nice satchel. Glad to see you're not just sitting there, not doing any yardwork (much like myself!). Crochet is way, way, way, better than knitting, I love it so much I will do it standing up whilst the smallest child hangs off my leg if I need to finish something. Mind you, I can ignore her whenever I need to.
    Moving on... what's your next project?
    My guardian in the US many many years ago called her bag a pocketbook. Confusing!

    ReplyDelete
  15. And how many comments have you had about that bag whilst out and about?! It's so sweet, i love it. Gorgeous colours - reminds me of fairy cakes for some reason..??! Lovely.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Love the satchel - your instructions look brill - I will let you know if I get round to making one.

    ReplyDelete
  17. just picked up grace violet's link to your apple. fab. you have a lovely blog, too. i may even invest in some knitting needles after seeing your satchel (not knitted yet!). Bridget (an Australian in Hertfordshire)

    ReplyDelete
  18. What a great idea and pattern. The grey and pink complement each other very well.

    ReplyDelete
  19. oh fun! This is a great idea - I have several almost-scarves sitting around...

    ReplyDelete
  20. Just stumbled here through a link for your ever so cute dolls house tut. After the first laugh i read on and on...laughing, having other members of the family wondering what t he heck was soooo funny. Love the way you speak/write...and the aprons...would love to make one of those...lovely weekend :)

    ReplyDelete
  21. You've been tagged with a Kreativ Blogger award...

    ReplyDelete
  22. This is very cute and actually really what I think I need to solve my itchy scarf dliemma. My first crochet project was/is a scarf in some 'soft' yarn that I have a very strong feeling will be much too itchy to wear around my neck. I hope it isn't too wonky to make into something like this.

    ReplyDelete
  23. oh, this bag is way to awesome for words! I adore it!

    ReplyDelete
  24. Sometimes the made-up-as-you-go-along crochet projects are totally the best ones!

    x

    ReplyDelete
  25. Great post! That is so crafty and hip!

    ReplyDelete
  26. that is so fab! Love your comments page link too :o) How are you finding the US? I moved to NY after 16 years in London and kept a similar blog ... Irish Girl in New York lol :o) I missed my little cottage in Ireland too much and came back here.

    ReplyDelete
  27. love your sweet bag!! will attempt to make one, thanks for the tutorial and I love your blog!!! Jasann from Australia

    ReplyDelete