Lazy crayon roll tutorial

I made this crayon roll in the hopes of giving a little cheer to my friend's son, who has just started up with chemo again. I'm hoping that he still likes dinosaurs...
I have seen lots of crayon and pencil rolls on blogs and always thought that one would make a nice wee gift for a young child. . .nb. for some reason I tend to search for tutorials after I have made something, to see if I have made it correctly, rather than before, which would make far more sense... I did decide to make it a little different from the ones that I have seen so far, though. If you take a look at this photo, you'll notice that you can't see the stitched lines separating the crayon pockets. I do like the look of the stitched lines, but this way I can make it a little quicker, as I don't have to be so careful about making the stitched lines even and neat. Hence, this isn't a new idea, by any means, but this is the lazy version of the crayon roll.
I made this one for the triangular crayons, which are a little larger than normal crayons. I sandwiched one between two scraps of material and decided that 1" wide pockets would be a good fit. Normal crayons would probably need just ¾" wide pockets. I'll use the measurements for 16 larger crayons in the tutorial, but at the end you will find the approximate measurements for a crayon roll of 24 crayons (see italics).
For 16 large triangular crayons:
1. Cut out
...........1 18½" by 5½" rectangle of the exterior fabric
...........1 18½" by 5½" rectangle of interfacing or flannel
...........1 18½" by 12½" rectangle of the interior fabric

2. Measure 5½" down from the top of interior fabric rectangle and draw a horizontal line (A to B). Fold the fabric along this line so that the right sides are facing. The slightly larger side should be on top.
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3. Mark a horizontal line (C to D) 3½" up from the fold (A to B), then mark parallel vertical lines from this line to the fold every inch along the rectangle (shown by red dotted lines). Sew along these lines.
4. Fold the front half of the fabric down along line C to D, covering the lines that you have just sewn.
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5. (Iron on the interfacing to the wrong side of a fabric rectangle if you are using interfacing. If using flannel place the exterior and interior fabrics right sides facing on top of the flannel) Line up the interior and exterior rectangles right sides facing, pinning a small elastic hairband to one of the short sides. Sew around the edges using a ¼" seam allowance (as shown by the red dotted lines), leaving a gap on the final short side for turning. Make sure that you catch the edge of the elastic loop when you sew that end.
6. Turn it right sides out, press, then top stitch around the edge. This will close the opening.
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7. Put the crayons in their pockets, roll it up, then sew on a button at the point that the elastic loop reaches. Done.

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For 24 regular crayons:
The smaller rectangle will be about 20½" by 5" (24 crayons multiplied by ¾" pocket width, plus an additional inch for either end plus ½" seam allowance)
The larger rectangle will be approximately 20½" by 11½" . Measure 5" down to make line A to B, then measure 3 ¼" up from that fold to mark line C to D. To mark the parallel pocket lines, start one inch from the left edge, then mark every ¾" across, until you have 1" left.

You can use a ribbon to tie it, instead of a button and loop - just catch the ends of the ribbons as you sew the edge.
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Tell me if you have any questions or if you notice any glaring errors. The friend that I attempted to teach algebra to can attest to the fact that I am not any good at explaining things. I'd have taken pictures as I made it, but I thought, 'oh, that's an easy thing to explain', apparently forgetting that it would be me attempting to explain it...
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Translation of the day:
UK English: revise = study (usually before an exam) in US English
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As in, I think I might be dragging out my old maths books and doing some revising soon, if my 5 year old son is already bringing home geometry homework...

30 comments:

  1. I'm sure he's going to love it. Nipper has taken a shine to dinosaurs all of a sudden. Re the homework - when Miss Muffet started primary school she brought home a maths worksheet and I couldn't make head nor tail of it. So much for my O Level!

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  2. Nice work. Would also be handy for crochet hooks... Just sorry about the circumstances - hope your friend's little boy and his family are doing okay.

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  3. What a sweet idea!

    Also, THANKS for all of the translations. I've never understood what they are talking about on the radio when students call in to say they are revising. I thought, "Man, the English must write a TON of papers to be revising all the time!"

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  4. I suspect this could be adapted for larger drawing implements...like color pencils. Not by me, mind you, I'm not a sewer, but aren't you crafty to create one! Nice work. ~tina

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  5. I'm sure he will love this gift. I'm keeping him in my prayers.

    I love the crayon roll in general....I think my children would have LOVED them.

    As for the triangular crayons. You know your children are getting older when you aren't "UP" on he latest crayola fad! :-)

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  6. Thanks for the tutorial. Like the hidden sewn pockets as lead foot sewers do not necessarily sew 100% straight all the time. :D And can I be buggered to rip and restitch?? Hope your son's friend is doing better (poor little soul) and I am sure that he will love his dinosaur pressies.

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  7. What a lovely gesture, I'm sure he will love it! I've mentally tucked some prayers for him inside of it!

    Quick question - would you be interested in making and selling one of your fabric houses to me? I think it would make a great Christmas gift for my 2 year old twin nieces, and I'm not sure I have the skills. But if you are not interested I'll give your tutorial a go.

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  8. Your crayon holder is so fun, thanks for posting the tutorial!

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  9. such a lovely gift...thanks for sharing how you made it.

    blessings to that sweet boy for all he is enduring...your gift is sure to brighten his day.

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  10. Oh, what a wonderful idea to fill my little one's stockings and to gift to their friends this year! Thanks for the idea. Also, where did you get those triangular crayons? I have not seen such a thing before but would love them for my little ones. I think it would help my 2 yo hold the crayons better.

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  11. what a sweet little gift! I'm sure he'll love it.

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  12. amei esse estojo, parabéns, seus trabalhos são lindos!!! vou até colocar seu link no meu blog.
    abraços,
    liu

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  13. What a great idea. Thanks for the wonderful tutorial!!

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  14. Oh love the dino print - thanks for the tutorial - it is going onto the sewing list for a few little boys for christmas

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  15. Hi there,
    great tutorial, thanks.
    I can't, however, work out how you fold it to not show the lines, but I have already made 3, as the measurements are perfect!!
    I am going to tackle your 'apples and pears' next!!

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  16. D'oh!!!

    Of course as soon as I actually write down that I don't understand something, it becomes glaringly obvious!
    Still my lines are fairly straight so no worries
    Thanks again

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  17. Thank you for this . . . I was able to make one of these during a short nap time--something I never would have attempted with a non-lazy roll. My little girl loves it.

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  19. looks like I'll be putting this on my Christmas to do list. Thanks!

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  20. Thanks soooo much! I just made one for my daughters birthday. She is going to love it. I will soon show it on my blog.
    Greetings from Germany.

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  21. Thanks for the tutorial. I made a few to use as gifts. Love your blog, btw- can't wait to make the dollhouse.

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  25. I am just learning to sew and I wanted to make something for my 2 year old, so, I made him this to keep his crayons together. I was so proud of myself I took it to show my family and my godchild started screaming she wanted one, so, I am making her one for her birthday. Thank you so much for this tutorial and this website.

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  27. Thank you! I made one of these for my sons teachers little girl and now I have more teachers that want one! Love the triangle crayons!!!

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  28. I know my comments are like 2 years after you posted the tutorial but as I'm new to this I'm sure you'd let me off!!!! I've made one of these today and posted pictures of it plus linked your tutorial on my blog (http://www.bella-boutiqueuk.blogspot.com/) - I love the hidden stitching looks really professional!

    Hope your friends boy is doing ok,

    Keri

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  29. Well, I just had a wonderful time reading through your blog. You are so funny! I am a US lass, living in the UK! I was thinking of making a bunch of these for a craft fair....I do so LOVE the lazy version...Stay sane!

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