What's an English muffin?

I've got a to-do list in my head and I thought that making some summer clothes for my daughter - and for me - was at the top of it (what with it already being summer, and all...). I just can't seem to settle down and get started, though.
.
This is what I've been up to instead: pretend food
I've got all sorts of ideas for more play food rattling around in my head, but have apparently started on the most important of all the food groups...
.
The cupcakes were from a pattern, though. I didn't bother knitting the cherry and I also altered the pattern slightly for the cupcake shown above, by adding a couple of extra rows to the base and removing a couple of rows from the icing. When I bake fairy cakes they don't tend to rise much...
.
I also made a really quick and easy peg loom today for my kids as a cheap introduction to weaving. All I did was hammer some nails into a battered old picture frame that I no longer use, then wrap string around the nails.
The plan was to add more nails once the kids had got the hang of it. Looks like I'd better do that now, as this was the work of my just-turned 3 year old, with only a little verbal couching along the lines of 'watch out, you missed a string there' from mum. I'm looking forward to seeing what her brother might produce.
nb. I think it helped to have an even number of pegs, so that each row is started the same way - ie. always going under first, then over. My inspiration was this tutorial on making a loom from a Styrofoam tray and there's also more details on how to weave there, too.
.
Translation of the day:
UK English: biscuit = cookie in US English
US English: biscuit = no idea: they look like scones, yet taste a little different and tend to be used in place of a dinner roll or as a topping for some baked dishes etc.
US English: English muffin = no idea. Looks a little like a crumpet. All I know is that they laugh at you if you are an English person asking the waiter 'what is an English muffin?' in an American restaurant.
.
I'm having a craving for battenberg cake...

17 comments:

  1. I'm having a craving for cup cakes! How cute ... I might have to look in to the weaving ... I seem to be getting no where with the knitting!

    ReplyDelete
  2. OMG you are delightful! I just found you via smoothpebble's blog, then proceeded to burn up way too much time AT WORK...naughty one I am! thanks for sharing all your adventures

    ReplyDelete
  3. Ah yes batternberg that tea time favourite. My mum used to make her own - what a palaver! Now that's a UK word no?!

    ReplyDelete
  4. How odd - I always expected an English muffin to be a muffin. Not the cake kind of muffin but the savoury toasted kind of muffin, and here you are saying it's like a crumpet ?? I'm confused.

    But battenberg cake. Ahhh.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Here's what more internet research showed up: English Muffins are a more bread-like version of the Crumpet, invented in America.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Muffins, scones, crumpets, oh my I'm all fermished with whats English and whats American. You still can't beat a true Marks and Sparks Jaffa cake though!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Love the pretend food. Those little cupcakes are adorable. The weaving looks so fun! Your 3 year old is quite talented. :)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Aaack! Cuteness overload! I'm having a yarn sugar rush! The cupcakes are adorable. I too, am trying to get clothing sewing done, and this isn't helping my procraftination.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I'm just always grateful for my fellow Americans that pass by the delicious canisters of McVittie's simply because they're called "digestive biscuits." I love them so.
    What, pray tell, is a battenberg cake?

    ReplyDelete
  10. Love the bread vernacular! I'm going to start calling English muffins crumpets in a very poorly done English accent. Love the weaving loom. Super idea!

    ReplyDelete
  11. That English muffin part made me laugh out loud! You're hilarious. Incidentally, I am going to try to include more UK words in my vocabulary. It just seems so dignified.

    ReplyDelete
  12. So did you ever find out what they call an English muffin really is?
    (in English English please)
    I once was told in Illinois I had a really good English accent for a foreigner,LOLS!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Your loom is quite similar to mine! I like how you didn't put in so many nails. That keeps it simpler, especially for younger ones.

    BTW, I like your translations. My parents are English (and I have dual US-UK nationality), so I completely know what you mean!

    Thanks for your comment on my blog, and enjoy your day.

    PS. The cupcakes are lovely!

    ReplyDelete
  14. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hey I too tried baking cup cakes and fairy cakes just after my exams got over. I go weak in the knees with a mention of muffins and cakes.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I've been procrastinating long enough, this project of yours has been on my to do list for a very long time. Now that its almost winter I am gearing up to do it as a quiet indoor activity :).. had to come back and make sure I have the instructions just right!

    ReplyDelete